Possible Research Topics

The program welcomes proposals for comparative studies that further understanding of legal training and legal practice both in North America and globally.

  • Access to legal education

  • Who enters the profession and why

  • Why students choose law school

  • What determines which law schools students attend

  • How students are channeled into law school

  • How law schools decide whom to admit, especially the non-LSAT, non-GPA components of those decisions

  • The qualities, apart from LSAT score and undergraduate GPA, that are associated with success in law school

  • How changes in the policy related to affirmative action have affected law school admissions, climate, and curricula

  • How social and academic backgrounds affect the experience of legal education

  • The economics of legal education

  • Effects of different teaching methods

  • Studies of teaching methods for some of the new and nontraditional courses (e.g., courses in quantitative methods, alternative dispute resolution, etc.)

  • Why students choose particular courses, and what, if anything, their choices have to do with their career directions

  • The effects of new technologies (e.g., computer-assisted research, electronic casebooks)

  • How new and nontraditional courses and new types of courses are introduced into the curriculum

  • How students decide what kinds of jobs to take

  • How students are channeled into practice settings

  • The factors that determine who enters, remains in, or leaves different areas of law practice

  • Student careers from college to first job

  • The conditions and methods that enable students to learn most effectively in law school

  • How legal education changes students cognitively, socially, and behaviorally